Determinants of workplace health program participation among non, low, and incentive-achieving participants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors used a cross-sectional survey and zero-inflated ordered probit modeling to investigate individual psychosocial-, interpersonal-, organizational-, and community-level determinants distinguishing nonparticipants, low-level participants, and incentive-achieving participants in a single, university-based worksite health program (WHP) that uses insurance premium reductions to incentivize participation. Results from 319 employees suggested two nonparticipant groups. Persons without employer-sponsored insurance, those with negative participation perceptions, and men were more likely to be “never” participants; those who had never met the incentive were potential future participants. Increased confidence was related to incentive achievement; stress was associated with low participation. No interpersonal, organizational, or community factors were significant. When structuring incentives, WHPs should consider determinants of participation, vis-à-vis the incentive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-128
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Workplace Behavioral Health
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2019

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Workplace
Motivation
Health
Insurance
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Worksite health programs
  • incentives
  • participation
  • zero-inflated ordered probit models

Cite this

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title = "Determinants of workplace health program participation among non, low, and incentive-achieving participants",
abstract = "The authors used a cross-sectional survey and zero-inflated ordered probit modeling to investigate individual psychosocial-, interpersonal-, organizational-, and community-level determinants distinguishing nonparticipants, low-level participants, and incentive-achieving participants in a single, university-based worksite health program (WHP) that uses insurance premium reductions to incentivize participation. Results from 319 employees suggested two nonparticipant groups. Persons without employer-sponsored insurance, those with negative participation perceptions, and men were more likely to be “never” participants; those who had never met the incentive were potential future participants. Increased confidence was related to incentive achievement; stress was associated with low participation. No interpersonal, organizational, or community factors were significant. When structuring incentives, WHPs should consider determinants of participation, vis-{\`a}-vis the incentive.",
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author = "Dauner, {Kim N} and McIntosh, {Christopher R} and Lin Xiu",
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