Determinants of housing quality: A comparison of white, African-American, and Hispanic single-parent women

Christine C. Cook, Marilyn J. Bruin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines housing quality among three groups of single-parent women: white, African-American, and Hispanic. Three indicators of housing quality-crowding, affordability, and satisfaction-are used to discover the extent to which these groups experience housing problems. This study also explores differences and similarities in the factors that precipitate problems in housing quality for these three groups of single parents. Findings suggest important differences and similarities in the nature of housing quality problems among white, African-American, and Hispanic single-parent women. The specified variables explained about 20% of the variance in crowding, housing affordability, and housing satisfaction. On measures of objective and subjective housing quality, white single mothers are better housed than their African-American or Hispanic counterparts. Hispanic single mothers have the largest housing cost burden and average more persons per household than the other groups. African-Americans are twice as likely as either group to live in low-quality housing and reported the lowest average satisfaction with their housing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-347
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Family and Economic Issues
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Keywords

  • crowding
  • housing
  • housing cost burden
  • housing satisfaction
  • single parents

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