Determinants of high weight gain and high BMI status in the first three months in urban Chinese infants

Jianduan Zhang, Jingxiong Jiang, John H Himes, Jing Zhang, Guoyan Liu, Xiaona Huang, Yuan Guo, Junxin Shi, Shuhua Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: Investigate the potential factors associated with high weight gain and high BMI status in the first three months of life. Methods: Totally, 930 healthy neonates (489 boys and 441 girls) were involved in this community-based, prospective study in China. Data on body weight and length were collected at birth, and the 1st and 3rd months. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data regarding social demography, gestational status, delivery, and the feeding patterns of children. Results: Prevalences of high BMI status (BMI = 85th p, re WHO BMI standards) increased over time in both sexes, reaching 24.5% and 12.0% for boys and girls, respectively. General linear mixed models indicate high BMI status at 3 months is significantly and inversely associated with breastfeeding, as a proportion of feeding occasions [OR 0.74 (95%CI: 0.56-0.98)] and positively with lower birth weight [OR 2.07 (95%CI: 1.23-3.49)]. High weight gain (=85th p, re WHO velocity standards) in the first 3 months is also significantly associated with breastfeeding [OR 0.76 (95%CI: 0.59-0.96)] and sex, with boys at a higher risk than girls [OR 1.44 (95%CI: 1.07-1.97)]. Living in an extended family is associated with both high weight gain and high BMI status, but with marginal statistical significance. Conclusion: Analyses indicate an increasing trend of high BMI status in early infancy. Breastfeeding provides a protective effect for both high weight gain and high BMI status. The results concerning birth weight suggests a target for intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-639
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

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Weight Gain
breast feeding
infant
Breast Feeding
weight gain
determinants
WHO
breastfeeding
Birth Weight
social data
extended family
statistical significance
extended families
body weight
demography
gender
low birth weight
infancy
Feeding Behavior
prospective studies

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Determinants of high weight gain and high BMI status in the first three months in urban Chinese infants. / Zhang, Jianduan; Jiang, Jingxiong; Himes, John H; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guoyan; Huang, Xiaona; Guo, Yuan; Shi, Junxin; Shi, Shuhua.

In: American Journal of Human Biology, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.09.2012, p. 633-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, J, Jiang, J, Himes, JH, Zhang, J, Liu, G, Huang, X, Guo, Y, Shi, J & Shi, S 2012, 'Determinants of high weight gain and high BMI status in the first three months in urban Chinese infants', American Journal of Human Biology, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 633-639. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.22284
Zhang, Jianduan ; Jiang, Jingxiong ; Himes, John H ; Zhang, Jing ; Liu, Guoyan ; Huang, Xiaona ; Guo, Yuan ; Shi, Junxin ; Shi, Shuhua. / Determinants of high weight gain and high BMI status in the first three months in urban Chinese infants. In: American Journal of Human Biology. 2012 ; Vol. 24, No. 5. pp. 633-639.
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