Detectors for the South Pole Telescope

C. L. Chang, P. Ade, K. Aird, J. Austermann, J. Beall, D. Becker, B. Benson, L. Bleem, J. Britton, J. Carlstrom, H. Cho, T. De Haan, T. Crawford, A. Crites, A. Datesman, M. Dobbs, W. Everett, A. Ewall-Wice, E. George, N. HalversonN. Harrington, J. Henning, G. Hilton, W. Holzapfel, S. Hoover, J. Hubmayr, K. Irwin, R. Keisler, J. Kennedy, A. Lee, E. Leitch, D. Li, M. Lueker, D. P. Marrone, J. McMahon, J. Mehl, S. Meyer, J. Montgomery, T. Montroy, T. Natoli, J. Nibarger, M. Niemack, V. Novosad, S. Padin, T. Plagge, C. Pryke, C. Reichardt, J. Ruhl, B. Saliwanchik, J. Sayre, K. Schafer, E. Shirokoff, K. Story, K. Vanderlinde, J. Vieira, G. Wang, R. Williamson, V. Yefremenko, K. W. Yoon, E. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10-m mm/sub-mm telescope at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. It's primary science goals consist of a galaxy cluster survey for understanding Dark Energy and probing the physics of Inflation through the CMB polarization. Both science goals require exceptional sensitivity necessitating focal planes with many optical elements. The focal planes of the SPT utilize Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers to build arrays of nearly 1000 detectors. In this talk, I will present the TES bolometer technology for both the first SPT focal plane and its upcoming upgrade to a polarization sensitive array.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1381-1388
Number of pages8
JournalPhysics Procedia
Volume37
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event2nd International Conference on Technology and Instrumentation in Particle Physics, TIPP 2011 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Jun 9 2011Jun 14 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Work at the University of Chicago is supported by grants from the NSF (awards ANT-0638937 and PHY-0114422), the Kavli Foundation, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. The work at Argonne National Laboratory, including the use of facility at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), was supported by the Office of Science (Basic Energy Sciences and High Energy Physics) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Technical support from Nanofabrication Group at the CNM, Argonne National Laboratory, is gratefully acknowledged.

Keywords

  • South Pole Telescope
  • bolometer
  • cosmic microwave background
  • transition edge sensor

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