DETECTING JOB DIFFERENCES: A MONTE CARLO STUDY

RICHARD D. ARVEY, SCOTT E. MAXWELL, RHONDA L. GUTENBERG, CAMERON CAMP

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Abstract

A monte carlo computer study was conducted where the statistical power of the univariate repeated measures ANOVA design proposed by Arvey and Mossholder (1977) to detect job differences was investigated. Also investigated was the relative value and usefulness of omega‐squared estimates to indicate job similarities and differences. Job profile means and covariance structures were generated by using data from six relatively similar jobs and six dissimilar jobs based on Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) data bank information. Different combinations of job differences (4 conditions), number of job raters (2 conditions), and violations of statistical assumptions (3 conditions) were generated (1000 sets for each of the 24 combinations) and each data set analyzed using the ANOVA design. Results indicate that testing for statistical significance is not as useful in determining job differences as examining the omega‐squared estimates. Specifically, the omega‐squared estimates for the interaction of the Jobs × Dimension effect is a relatively sensitive and stable indicator of job differences regardless of the number of raters and violations of the statistical assumptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-730
Number of pages22
JournalPersonnel Psychology
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1981

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    ARVEY, RICHARD. D., MAXWELL, SCOTT. E., GUTENBERG, RHONDA. L., & CAMP, CAMERON. (1981). DETECTING JOB DIFFERENCES: A MONTE CARLO STUDY. Personnel Psychology, 34(4), 709-730. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6570.1981.tb01425.x