Detached eddy simulation of RCS-aerodynamic interaction of mars science laboratory capsule

David M. Peterson, Graham V. Candler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Detached eddy simulation is used to simulate the Mars Science Laboratory capsule as it enters the Martian atmosphere at Mach 18.1. The simulations are used to numerically investigate several RCS thruster firing combinations which correspond to roll, yaw and pitch maneuvers. The simulations are done to identify any aerodynamic interactions that reduce the effectiveness of the RCS thrusters or introduce significant cross-channel interactions. A hybrid, unstructured solver is used for the simulations. The flexibility in grid design provided by the unstructured solver allows for the wide range of geometric scales to be resolved but also maintain a manageable total cell count. The simulations presented here represent the early stages of using detached eddy simulation to produce unsteady solutions of this type of flow and to apply the simulations to situations of practical interest. The simulations reveal interactions that reduce RCS effectiveness by more than 10% of the ideal applied moment for yaw and (-)pitch maneuvers. Cross-channel interactions greater than 5% of the ideal applied moment are seen in roll and yaw maneuvers. The flow field created by each thruster firing combination is examined and features leading to the aerodynamic interactions are identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Jan 7 2008Jan 10 2008

Publication series

Name46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit

Other

Other46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit
CountryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period1/7/081/10/08

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