Designing intervention effectiveness studies for occupational health and safety: The Minnesota wood dust study

L. M. Brosseau, D. L. Parker, DeAnn Lazovich, T. Milton, S. Dugan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: A planning model was used to guide the design of a randomized controlled study of the effectiveness of tailored interventions in lowering dust exposures in small woodworking shops. Methods: Guided by Green's PRECEDE-PROCEED model, we used a planning committee, focus groups and a pilot study to gain information on small woodworking shops, causes of and controls for high dust levels, and barriers and incentives surrounding availability and use of dust controls. Results: The planning committee identified key characteristics of small woodworking shop owners. Focus groups with owners and employees served to further elucidate why dust control was considered unimportant. The pilot study gave measures of dust exposures, tasks, and use of controls. Interventions focused on providing owners with technical and economic assistance to lower dust levels and an educational program for employees discussing health effects and effective methods of dust control. Conclusions: The PRECEDE-PROCEED model proved a useful framework for designing an intervention in the occupational setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-61
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2002

Keywords

  • Dust
  • Effectiveness
  • Focus group
  • Intervention
  • Occupational health and safety
  • PRECEDE-PROCEED
  • Pilot study
  • Planning committee
  • Wood

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