Designing a wrist-worn sensor to improve medication adherence: Accommodating diverse user behaviors and technology preferences

Jenna L. Marquard, Barry Saver, Swaminathan Kandaswamy, Vanessa I. Martinez, Jane M. Simoni, Joanne D. Stekler, Deepak Ganesan, James Scanlan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: High medication adherence is important for HIV suppression (antiretroviral therapy) and pre-exposure prophylaxis efficacy. We are developing sensor-based technologies to detect pill-taking gestures, trigger reminders, and generate adherence reports. Materials and Methods: We collected interview, observation, and questionnaire data from individuals with and at-risk for HIV (N = 17). We assessed their medication-taking practices and physical actions, and feedback on our initial design. Results: While participants displayed diverse medication taking practices and physical actions, most (67%) wanted to use the system to receive real-time and summative feedback, and most (69%) wanted to share data with their physicians. Participants preferred reminders via the wrist-worn device or mobile app, and summative feedback via mobile app or email. Discussion: Adoption of these systems is promising if designs accommodate diverse behaviors and preferences. Conclusion: Our findings may help improve the accuracy and adoption of the system by accounting for user behaviors, physical actions, and preferences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-158
Number of pages6
JournalJAMIA Open
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Keywords

  • Gestures
  • HIV infections
  • Human engineering
  • Medication adherence
  • Smartphone

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