Design and evaluation of a portable negative pressure hood with HEPA filtration to protect health care workers treating patients with transmissible respiratory infections

Hai Thien Phu, Yensil Park, Austin J Andrews, Ian A Marabella, Asish Abraham, Reid Mimmack, Bernard A. Olson, Jonathan Chaika, Eugene Floersch, Mojca Remskar, Janet R. Hume, Gwenyth A. Fischer, Kumar Belani, Christopher J. Hogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: To mitigate potential exposure of healthcare workers (HCWs) to SARS-CoV-2 via aerosol routes, we have developed a portable hood which not only creates a barrier between HCW and patient, but also utilizes negative pressure with filtration of aerosols by a high-efficiency particulate air filter. Material and Methods: The hood has iris-port openings for access to the patient, and an opening large enough for a patient's head and upper torso. The top of the hood is a high-efficiency particulate air filter connected to a blower to apply negative pressure. We determined the aerosol penetration from outside to inside in laboratory experiments. Results: The penetration of particles from within the hood to the breathing zones of HCWs outside the hood was near 10-4 (0.01%) in the 200-400 nm size range, and near 10−3 (0.1%) for smaller particles. Penetration values for particles in the 500 nm-5 μm range were below 10−2 (1%). Fluorometric analysis of deposited fluorescein particles on the personal protective equipment of an HCW revealed that negative pressure reduces particle deposition both outside and inside the hood. Conclusions: We find that negative pressure hoods can be effective controls to mitigate aerosol exposure to HCWs, while simultaneously allowing access to patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1237-1243
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of infection control
Volume48
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: The authors acknowledge support from the University of Minnesota COVID-19 Rapid Response Grant Program and the Institute for Engineering in Medicine (IEM).

Funding Information:
The prototype Aerosol Hood was constructed by Ron Bystrom, Peter Ness, Bob Jones, and Nathan Walkington of the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering Machine Shop. Funding: The authors acknowledge support from the University of Minnesota COVID-19 Rapid Response Grant Program and the Institute for Engineering in Medicine (IEM).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.

Keywords

  • Aerosol based disease transmission
  • HEPA air filtration
  • Nosocomial infection

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Evaluation Study
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Design and evaluation of a portable negative pressure hood with HEPA filtration to protect health care workers treating patients with transmissible respiratory infections'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this