Depressive symptoms, insulin resistance, and risk of diabetes in women at midlife

Susan A. Everson-Rose, Peter M. Meyer, Lynda H. Powell, Dilip Pandey, Javier I. Torréns, Howard M. Kravitz, Joyce T. Bromberger, Karen A. Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To examine depression and 3-year change in insulin resistance and risk of diabetes and whether associations vary by race. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We analyzed data from 2,662 Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, Japanese-American, and Chinese-American women without a history of diabetes from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. We estimated regression coefficients and odds ratios to determine whether depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score ≥ 16) predicted increases in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and greater risk of incident diabetes, respectively, over 3 years. RESULTS - Mean baseline HOMA-IR was 1.31 (SD 0.86) and increased 0.05 units per year for all women (P < 0.0001). A total of 97 incident cases of diabetes occurred. Depression was associated with absolute levels of HOMA-IR (P < 0.04) but was unrelated to changes in HOMA-IR; associations did not vary by race. The association between depression and HOMA-IR was eliminated after adjustment for central adiposity (P = 0.85). Depression predicted a 1.66-fold greater risk of diabetes (P < 0.03), which became nonsignificant after adjustment for central adiposity (P = 0.12). We also observed a depression-by-race interaction (P < 0.05) in analyses limited to Caucasians and African Americans, the only groups with enough diabetes cases to reliably test this interaction. Race-stratified models showed that depression predicted 2.56-fold greater risk of diabetes in African Americans only, after risk factor adjustment (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS - Depression is associated with higher HOMA-IR values and incident diabetes in middle-aged women. These associations are mediated largely through central adiposity. However, African-American women with depression experience increased risk of diabetes independent of central adiposity and other risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2856-2862
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes care
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

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Insulin Resistance
Depression
Homeostasis
Adiposity
African Americans
Asian Americans
Risk Adjustment
Women's Health
Hispanic Americans
Epidemiologic Studies
Research Design
Odds Ratio

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Everson-Rose, S. A., Meyer, P. M., Powell, L. H., Pandey, D., Torréns, J. I., Kravitz, H. M., ... Matthews, K. A. (2004). Depressive symptoms, insulin resistance, and risk of diabetes in women at midlife. Diabetes care, 27(12), 2856-2862. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.27.12.2856

Depressive symptoms, insulin resistance, and risk of diabetes in women at midlife. / Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Meyer, Peter M.; Powell, Lynda H.; Pandey, Dilip; Torréns, Javier I.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Matthews, Karen A.

In: Diabetes care, Vol. 27, No. 12, 01.12.2004, p. 2856-2862.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Everson-Rose, SA, Meyer, PM, Powell, LH, Pandey, D, Torréns, JI, Kravitz, HM, Bromberger, JT & Matthews, KA 2004, 'Depressive symptoms, insulin resistance, and risk of diabetes in women at midlife', Diabetes care, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 2856-2862. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.27.12.2856
Everson-Rose, Susan A. ; Meyer, Peter M. ; Powell, Lynda H. ; Pandey, Dilip ; Torréns, Javier I. ; Kravitz, Howard M. ; Bromberger, Joyce T. ; Matthews, Karen A. / Depressive symptoms, insulin resistance, and risk of diabetes in women at midlife. In: Diabetes care. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 2856-2862.
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AU - Torréns, Javier I.

AU - Kravitz, Howard M.

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AU - Matthews, Karen A.

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