Depressive symptoms in older versus younger people with epilepsy: Findings from an integrated epilepsy self-management clinical research dataset

Zaira Khalid, Hasina Momotaz, Farren Briggs, Kristin A. Cassidy, Naomi S. Chaytor, Robert T. Fraser, Mary R. Janevic, Barbara Jobst, Erica K. Johnson, Peter Scal, Tanya M. Spruill, Betsy K. Wilson, Martha Sajatovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: There are limited data on psychological outcomes in older people with epilepsy (PWE). This analysis, from a large pooled dataset of clinical studies from the Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network, examined clinical variables including depressive symptom severity, quality of life and epilepsy self-management competency among older (age 55+) vs younger (<age 55) PWE. We were particularly interested in differences between older vs younger individuals with clinically significant depression. Methods: Analyses used baseline data from 9 MEW Network studies and examined demographic and clinical variables. Older vs younger individuals were compared and then we assessed groups with clinically significant depression vs those without clinically significant depression using the PHQ-9 and QOLIE-10 as a measure of quality of life. Results: The sample included 935 individuals. Compared to younger adults (n=774), the older group (n=161) had a better quality of life (p= 0.041) and more individuals without clinically significant depression (p=0.038). There was a trend for slightly lower depression severity scores (PHQ-9 total) (p=0.07) in the older group and a trend for fewer seizures (p=0.055) in older adults relative to younger adults. Conclusion: Compared to younger PWE, older PWE have less clinically significant depression and better quality of life. Future research needs to identify possible mechanisms underlying these differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)981-988
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported in part by CDC grants U48DP001930 (CWRU), 48DP005030 (CWRU) U48DP0 05008 (NYU), 148DP005013 (WA), and 1U48DP005018 (Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) under the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research Centers Program.

Funding Information:
KAC reports a grant from the Center for Disease Control, during the conduct of the study. NSC reports personal fees from Eli Lilly, outside the submitted work. BJ reports non-financial support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Diamond Foundation, Eisai, Inc., the National Science Foundation, Neuropace, Inc., and Sunovion, outside the submitted work. MS reports grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), during the conduct of the study; grants from Otsuka, Alkermes, Janssen, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders, the Reuter Foundation, the Woodruff Foundation, the Reinberger Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH); personal fees from Alkermes, Bracket, Otsuka, Janssen, Neurocrine, Health Analytics, and Frontline Medical Communications; royalties from Springer Press, Johns Hopkins University Press, Oxford Press, UpToDate, compensation for the preparation of continuing medical education (CME) materials from American Physician’s Institute, MCM Education, CMEology, Potomac Center for Medical Education, Global Medical Education, Creative Educational Concepts, outside the submitted work. The authors report no other conflicts of interest in this work.

Funding Information:
Portions of these data were presented at the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP) Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; March, 2019 This study was supported in part by CDC grants U48DP001930 (CWRU), 48DP005030 (CWRU) U48DP0 05008 (NYU), 148DP005013 (WA), and 1U48DP005018 (Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) under the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research Centers Program.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Khalid et al. T.

Keywords

  • Database
  • Depression
  • Epilepsy
  • Quality of life
  • Self-management

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Depressive symptoms in older versus younger people with epilepsy: Findings from an integrated epilepsy self-management clinical research dataset'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this