Depressive symptoms and subjective and objective sleep in community-dwelling older women

Jeanne E. Maglione, Sonia Ancoli-Israel, Katherine W. Peters, Misti L. Paudel, Kristine Yaffe Md, Kristine E. Ensrud, Katie L. Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and subjective and objective sleep in older women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Four U.S. clinical centers. PARTICIPANTS: Three thousand forty-five communitydwelling women aged 70 and older. MEASUREMENTS: Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, categorizing participants as normal (0-2, reference), some depressive symptoms (3-5), or depressed (≥6). Subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Objective sleep measures were assessed using wrist actigraphy. RESULTS: In multivariable-adjusted models, there were graded associations between greater level of depressive symptoms and worse subjective sleep quality and more subjective daytime sleepiness (P-trends < .001). Women with some depressive symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.48-2.24) and depressed (OR = 2.84, 95% CI = 2.08-3.86) women had greater odds of reporting poor sleep (PSQI>5). Women with some depressive symptoms (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.47-2.64) and depressed women (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.12-2.58) had greater odds of reporting excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS>10). There were also graded associations between greater level of depressive symptoms and objectively measured wake after sleep onset (WASO) (P-trend = .03) and wake episodes longer than 5 minutes (P-trend = .006). Depressed women had modestly higher odds of WASO of 1 hour or longer (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.03-1.83). Women with some depressive symptoms (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.19-1.86) and depressed women (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.52-2.74) had greater odds of being in the highest quartile for number of nap episodes longer than 5 minutes. No associations between depressive symptom level and prolonged sleep latency, poor sleep efficiency, or short or long total sleep time were found. CONCLUSION: Greater depressive symptom levels were associated with more subjective sleep disturbance and objective evidence of sleep fragmentation and napping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-643
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Age
  • Depression
  • Elderly
  • Sleep

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