Depressed Mood and Other Variables Related to Bone Marrow Transplantation Survival in Acute Leukemia

Eduardo A. Colón, Allan L. Callies, Michael K. Popkin, Philip B. McGlave

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Scopus citations

Abstract

Routine psychiatric evaluations of 100 adult patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia were reviewed to examine the possible relationship of psychiatric and psychosocial factors to duration of survival following the procedure. Three variables were found to independently affect outcome: illness status (first remission vs. other status), presence of depressed mood, and the extent of perceived social support. Patients transplanted while in their first remission had significantly improved survival; patients with depressed mood, regardless of specific psychiatric diagnosis, had poorer outcomes; and patients with a high level of perceived social support had improved survival. The possible mechanisms by which these variables affect outcome are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-425
Number of pages6
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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