Dependence of transition state structure on substrate: The intrinsic C-13 kinetic isotope effect is different for physiological and slow substrates of the ornithine decarboxylase reaction because of different hydrogen bonding structures

Daria Sicinska, Donald G. Truhlar, Piotr Paneth

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27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ornithine decarboxylase is the first and the rate-controlling enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis; it decarboxylates L-ornithine to form the diamine putrescine. We present calculations performed using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method with the AM1 semiempirical Hamiltonian for the wild-type ornithine decarboxylase reaction with ornithine (the physiological substrate) and lysine (a "slow" substrate) and for mutant E274A with ornithine substrate. The dynamical method is variational transition state theory with quantized vibrations. We employ a single reaction coordinate equal to the carbon-carbon distance of the dissociating bond, and we find a large difference between the intrinsic kinetic isotope effect for the physiological substrate, which equals 1.04, and that for the slow substrate, which equals 1.06. This shows that, contrary to a commonly accepted assumption, kinetic isotope effects on slow substrates are not always good models of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects on physiological substrates. Furthermore, analysis of free-energy-based samples of transition state structures shows that the differences in kinetic isotope effects may be traced to different numbers of hydrogen bonds at the different transition states of the different reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5414-5422
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume127
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2005

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