Denial of Health Insurance Due to Preexisting Conditions: How Well Does One High-Risk Pool Work?

Brian Sumner, Bryan Dowd, Alfred M. Pheley, Nicole Lurie

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assesses whether Minnesota's high-risk insurance pool is successful at insuring those denied health insurance coverage because of preexisting medical conditions. Eight hundred and twenty-nine individuals who had been denied health insurance coverage were interviewed. At the time of the survey, 80 percent of the sample had obtained coverage, 22 percent through the state's high-risk insurance pool. Seventeen percent remained uninsured. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of remaining uninsured. Younger age and less education were significantly associated with being uninsured versus enrolling in the high-risk pool. Younger age, less education, unemployment, being non-White, and having worse mental health were significantly associated with being uninsured versus having non-high-risk pool insurance. Despite the presence of a large high-risk pool in Minnesota, specific groups are identified as being at risk for remaining uninsured after being denied health insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-371
Number of pages15
JournalMedical Care Research and Review
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1997

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