Demographics and correlates of five-year change in echocardiographic left ventricular mass in young black and white adult men and women: The coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study

Julius M. Gardin, Debra Brunner, Pamela J. Schreiner, Xiaoyuan Xie, Cheryl L. Reid, Karen Ruth, Diane E. Bild, Samuel S. Gidding

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52 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine the presence and correlates of change (Δ) in left ventricular (LV) mass by echocardiography in young adults. BACKGROUND: Left ventricular mass is known to be a powerful independent predictor for cardiovascular disease events in adults. However, little is known about Δ in LV mass over time in young adults. METHODS: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) is a multicenter, longitudinal, population-based study of black and white men and women who were ages 23 to 35 at the time of their initial two-dimensionally directed M-mode echocardiography exam (year 5); half the cohort had a repeat echocardiography exam five years later (year 10). Data were analyzed from 1,189 participants who had paired echocardiography studies. To minimize reader variability, blinded measurements on initial and repeat echocardiography were performed nearly contemporaneously by the same reader. RESULTS: In multilinear regression analyses, significant (p > 0.05) predictors of year 10 two-dimensional guided M-mode LV mass included initial LV mass, initial body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI for all race/gender subgroups. Initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) was a significant predictor of year 10 LV mass in white men and black women; change in SBP was significant in black women with a trend towards significance in white women. Left ventricular mass remained constant in all race/gender subgroups, except black women, where it increased (by 5.9 g [mean]). Black women also had the largest increases in BMI and SBP. In black women, a five-year weight gain of 20 pounds and a 15-mm Hg increase in SBP would be expected to be associated with a 9% to 12% increase in LV mass. CONCLUSIONS: Particularly in black women, weight and blood pressure control may be important community health and treatment goals to prevent LV hypertrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-535
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2002

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by contracts NO1-HC 48047, 48048, 48049, 48050, 95095 and 95100 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

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