Demographic effects of canine parvovirus on a free-ranging wolf population over 30 years

L. David Mech, Sagar M Goyal, William J. Paul, Wesley E. Newton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We followed the course of canine parvovinis (CPV) antibody prevalence in a subpopulation of wolves (Canis 1upus) in northeastern Minnesota from 1973, when antibodies were first detected, through 2004. Annual early pup survival was reduced by 70%, and wolf population change was related to CPV antibody prevalence. In the greater Minnesota population of 3,000 wolves, pup survival was reduced by 40-60%. This reduction limited the Minnesota wolf population rate of increase to about 4% per year compared with increases of 16-58% in other populations. Because it is young wolves that disperse, reduced pup survival may have caused reduced dispersal and reduced recolonization of new range in Minnesota.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-836
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of wildlife diseases
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Carnivore protoparvovirus 1
wolves
antibody
demographic statistics
pups
seroprevalence
recolonization
subpopulation
Canis
dogs
effect
antibodies

Keywords

  • Canine parvovirus (CPV)
  • Demography
  • Dispersal
  • Population
  • Wolf

Cite this

Demographic effects of canine parvovirus on a free-ranging wolf population over 30 years. / Mech, L. David; Goyal, Sagar M; Paul, William J.; Newton, Wesley E.

In: Journal of wildlife diseases, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.01.2008, p. 824-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mech, L. David ; Goyal, Sagar M ; Paul, William J. ; Newton, Wesley E. / Demographic effects of canine parvovirus on a free-ranging wolf population over 30 years. In: Journal of wildlife diseases. 2008 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 824-836.
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