Deleterious effects of intra-arterial administration of particulate steroids on microvascular perfusion in a mouse model

Elisabeth Laemmel, Nicolas Segal, Massoud Mirshahi, Dalel Azzazene, Sylvie Le Marchand, Marc Wybier, Eric Vicaut, Jean Denis Laredo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the in vivo effects of several particulate steroids on microvascular perfusion by using intravital microscopy in a mice model and to investigate the in vitro interactions between these particulate steroids and red blood cells (RBCs). Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in agreement with the guidelines of the National Committee of Ethic Reflection on Animal Experimentation. By using intravital microscopy of mouse cremaster muscle, the in vivo effects of several particulate steroids on microvascular perfusion were assessed. Four to five mice were allocated to each of the following treatment groups: saline solution, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, a nonparticulate steroid, and the particulate steroids cortivazol, methylprednisolone, triamcinolone, and prednisolone. By using in vitro blood microcinematography and electron microscopy, the interactions between these steroids and human RBCs were studied. All results were analyzed by using nonparametric tests. Results: With prednisolone, methylprednisolone, or triamcinolone, blood flow was rapidly and completely stopped in all the arterioles and venules (median RBC velocity in first-order arterioles, 5 minutes after administration was zero for these three groups) compared with a limited effect in mice treated with saline, dexamethasone, and cortivazol (20.3, 21.3, and 27.5 mm/sec, respectively; P < .003). This effect was associated with a large decrease in the functional capillary density (4.21, 0, and 0 capillaries per millimeter for methylprednisolone, triamcinolone, or prednisolone, respectively, vs 21.0, 21.4, and 19.1 capillaries per millimeter in mice treated with saline, dexamethasone, and cortivazol, respectively; P < .003). This was because of the rapid formation of RBC aggregates. However, no change in microvascular perfusion was associated with administration of cortivazol or dexamethasone. In vitro experiments confirmed the formation of RBC aggregates associated with the transformation of RBCs into spiculated RBCs with the same steroids. Conclusion: Several particulate steroids have an immediate and massive effect on microvascular perfusion because of formation of RBC aggregates associated with the transformation of RBCs into spiculated RBCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-740
Number of pages10
JournalRadiology
Volume279
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Deleterious effects of intra-arterial administration of particulate steroids on microvascular perfusion in a mouse model'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this