Delayed peripheral venous catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: Onset ≥24 hours after catheter removal

Kathryn T. Sanchez, Karam M. Obeid, Susan Szpunar, Mohamad G. Fakih, Riad Khatib

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peripheral venous catheter (PVC)-associated bacteremia usually develops during the indwelling period. We present a review of 14 patients who developed delayed onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (D-SAB), 16 days after PVC removal, and compare them to 29 patients with early onset PVC-related S. aureus bacteremia (E-SAB). At the time of removal, the catheter site exhibited inflammation in 8 (57.1%) cases. At SAB onset, PVC site inflammation developed in all patients. Compared to E-SAB, patients with D-SAB were more often aged ≥65 y (71.4% vs. 34.5%; p 0.03) and on corticosteroids (35.7% vs. 6.9%; p 0.02). D-SAB was more complicated with persistent (>3 days) bacteremia (42.9% vs. 13.8%; p 0.04), metastatic infections (35.7% vs. 6.9%; p 0.02), and slightly higher mortality (21.4% vs. 10.3%; p 0.3). Logistic regression revealed that the predictors of D-SAB were corticosteroids (odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1658.61) and age ≥65 y (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.1223.30). These patients may have impaired local/systemic defenses that lead to D-SAB, or a blunted host response with delayed recognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-554
Number of pages4
JournalScandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume44
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Peripheral venous catheter
  • Staphylococcus aureus

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