Decreased steady-state insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) mRNA level is associated with differentiation of cultured porcine myogenic cells

B. J. Johnson, M. E. White, M. R. Hathaway, William R. Dayton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) affect the biological activity of IGF-I in several cell types, including cultured muscle cells. Additionally, at least one of the IGFBPs, IGFBP-3, has been shown to have IGF-independent effects on cell proliferation. Numerous studies have shown that immortalized muscle cell lines produce various IGFBPs, but to date no muscle cell line has been reported to produce IGFBP-3 protein or mRNA. Unlike muscle cell lines, primary cultures of porcine embryonic myogenic cells express IGFBP-3 mRNA and secrete a protein that is immunologically identifiable as IGFBP-3. Additionally, steady-state IGFBP-3 levels change significantly during differentiation. Here we report that differentiation of porcine myogenic cells in an IGFBP-3-free medium is accompanied by reduced steady-state IGFBP-3 mRNA levels. Steady-state levels of IGFBP-3 mRNA decreased approximately sevenfold (P < .05) during differentiation and then increased to predifferentiation levels once differentiation was complete. Addition of TGF-β1 (0.5 ng/ml) to porcine myogenic cultures suppressed fusion and resulted in a sevenfold increase in steady-state IGFBP-3 mRNA and a 1.8-fold increase in IGFBP-3 protein levels as compared to untreated control cultures (P < .05). Results suggest that alterations in IGFBP-3 mRNA and protein may play a role in differentiation of porcine embryonic muscle cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of cellular physiology
Volume179
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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