DECOLONIZING INDIGENOUS EDUCATION IN THE POSTWAR CITY: Native Women’s Activism from Southern California to the Motor City

Kyle T. Mays, Kevin Whalen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Urban Indigenous histories continue to write off Native people as being immigrants to cities and outside of modernity. They ignore gender as a category of analysis (Danziger, 1991; Fixico, 2000; LeGrand, 2002; Laukaitis, 2015). Yet, native women were actively engaged in culturally sustaining/revitalizing pedagogy (McCarty & Lee, 2014) and decolonial educational efforts in postwar cities. We move in both time and space, from postwar Southern California to Detroit, to illustrate how Native women challenged colonialism and gender conventions through education. They were what we call urban Indigenous feminists (Arvin, Tuck, & Morrill, 2013; Mays, 2015).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIndigenous And Decolonizing Studies in Education
Subtitle of host publicationMapping The Long View
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages116-130
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9780429998638
ISBN (Print)9781138585850
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Taylor & Francis.

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