Death of a thousand cuts: The impact of media coverage on public opinion about clinton’s health security act

Jeffrey Huebner, David P. Fan, John Finnegan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study used a time series method to assess the impact of media coverage on public opinion surrounding President Clinton’s universal health insurance proposal, the Health Security Act. The period examined began on September 1, 1993, and ended on August 31, 1994, coinciding with opinion surveys regarding support for, or opposition to, Clinton’s proposal. Results showed that support for the value of universal health coverage was high in the U.S., but negative media coverage predicted declines in public support for the specific Clinton plan. Speakers in the debate who served as sources for media coverage were examined. Analysis showed that politicians dominated the debate, as expected; there was a relatively low presence of interest group sources. Negative rhetoric concerning the Clinton plan was categorized as having negative consequences for government, society, and individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-270
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1997

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