De novo WNT5A-associated autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome suggests specificity of genotype and phenotype

FORGE Canada Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Robinow Syndrome (RS), a rare skeletal dysplasia syndrome, is characterized by dysmorphic features resembling a fetal face, mesomelic limb shortening, hypoplastic external genitalia in males, and renal and vertebral anomalies. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance have been reported. Since the description of autosomal dominant Robinow Syndrome (ADRS; OMIM 180700) in 1969 by Meinhard Robinow and colleagues, the molecular etiology remained elusive until only recently. WNT5A was proposed to be the candidate gene for ADRS, as mutations were found in two affected families, one of those being the originally described index family. We report three families with RS caused by novel heterozygous WNT5A mutations, which were confirmed in the first family by whole exome sequencing, and in all by Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the largest number of published families with ADRS in whom a WNT5A mutation was identified. Families 1 and 2 are the first cases showing de novo inheritance in the affected family members and thus strengthen the evidence for WNT5A as the causative gene in ADRS. Finally, we propose WNT5A mutation specificity in ADRS, which may affect interactions with other proteins in the Wnt pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Genetics
Volume87
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Genotype
Phenotype
Mutation
Male Genitalia
Exome
Genetic Databases
Inheritance Patterns
Wnt Signaling Pathway
Autosomal Dominant Robinow Syndrome
Genes
Extremities
Kidney
Proteins

Keywords

  • Autosomal dominant
  • Robinow syndrome
  • Skeletal dysplasia
  • WNT5A

Cite this

De novo WNT5A-associated autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome suggests specificity of genotype and phenotype. / FORGE Canada Consortium.

In: Clinical Genetics, Vol. 87, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 34-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Robinow Syndrome (RS), a rare skeletal dysplasia syndrome, is characterized by dysmorphic features resembling a fetal face, mesomelic limb shortening, hypoplastic external genitalia in males, and renal and vertebral anomalies. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance have been reported. Since the description of autosomal dominant Robinow Syndrome (ADRS; OMIM 180700) in 1969 by Meinhard Robinow and colleagues, the molecular etiology remained elusive until only recently. WNT5A was proposed to be the candidate gene for ADRS, as mutations were found in two affected families, one of those being the originally described index family. We report three families with RS caused by novel heterozygous WNT5A mutations, which were confirmed in the first family by whole exome sequencing, and in all by Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the largest number of published families with ADRS in whom a WNT5A mutation was identified. Families 1 and 2 are the first cases showing de novo inheritance in the affected family members and thus strengthen the evidence for WNT5A as the causative gene in ADRS. Finally, we propose WNT5A mutation specificity in ADRS, which may affect interactions with other proteins in the Wnt pathway.",
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