Dating violence, childhood maltreatment, and BMI from adolescence to young adulthood

Cari J Clark, Rachael A. Spencer, Susan Everson-Rose, Sonya S Brady, Susan M Mason, John E Connett, Kimberly M. Henderson, Michelle To, Shakira F. Suglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study tested whether dating violence (DV) victimization is associated with increases in BMI across the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and whether gender and previous exposure to child maltreatment modify such increases. METHODS: Data were from participants (N = 9295; 49.9% female) in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight at waves 2, 3, and 4 of the study. DV victimization was measured at waves 2, 3, and 4 by using items from the revised Conflict Tactics Scales. Linear regression by using generalized estimating equations with robust SEs was used to test the association. Models were stratified according to gender and history of child maltreatment. RESULTS: From baseline to wave 4, BMI increased on average 6.5 units (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.2-6.7) and 6.8 units (95% CI: 6.5-7.1) among men and women, respectively, and nearly one-half (45.5% of men; 43.9% of women) reported DV at some point. In stratified models, DV victimization (b: 0.3 [95% CI: 0.0-0.6]) independently predicted BMI increase over time in women. Exposure to childhood sexual abuse magnified the increase in BMI associated with DV victimization (b: 1.3 [95% CI: 0.3-2.3]). No other types of childhood maltreatment were significant modifiers of the DV-BMI association. Violence victimization was not associated with BMI among men. CONCLUSIONS: Screening and support for DV victims, especially women who have also experienced childhood maltreatment, may be warranted to reduce the likelihood of health consequences associated with victimization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)678-685
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume134
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Crime Victims
Confidence Intervals
Child Abuse
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Sex Offenses
Intimate Partner Violence
Violence
Linear Models
Weights and Measures
Health

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Child neglect
  • Domestic violence
  • Sexual abuse

Cite this

Dating violence, childhood maltreatment, and BMI from adolescence to young adulthood. / Clark, Cari J; Spencer, Rachael A.; Everson-Rose, Susan; Brady, Sonya S; Mason, Susan M; Connett, John E; Henderson, Kimberly M.; To, Michelle; Suglia, Shakira F.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 134, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 678-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clark, Cari J ; Spencer, Rachael A. ; Everson-Rose, Susan ; Brady, Sonya S ; Mason, Susan M ; Connett, John E ; Henderson, Kimberly M. ; To, Michelle ; Suglia, Shakira F. / Dating violence, childhood maltreatment, and BMI from adolescence to young adulthood. In: Pediatrics. 2014 ; Vol. 134, No. 4. pp. 678-685.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study tested whether dating violence (DV) victimization is associated with increases in BMI across the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and whether gender and previous exposure to child maltreatment modify such increases. METHODS: Data were from participants (N = 9295; 49.9{\%} female) in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight at waves 2, 3, and 4 of the study. DV victimization was measured at waves 2, 3, and 4 by using items from the revised Conflict Tactics Scales. Linear regression by using generalized estimating equations with robust SEs was used to test the association. Models were stratified according to gender and history of child maltreatment. RESULTS: From baseline to wave 4, BMI increased on average 6.5 units (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 6.2-6.7) and 6.8 units (95{\%} CI: 6.5-7.1) among men and women, respectively, and nearly one-half (45.5{\%} of men; 43.9{\%} of women) reported DV at some point. In stratified models, DV victimization (b: 0.3 [95{\%} CI: 0.0-0.6]) independently predicted BMI increase over time in women. Exposure to childhood sexual abuse magnified the increase in BMI associated with DV victimization (b: 1.3 [95{\%} CI: 0.3-2.3]). No other types of childhood maltreatment were significant modifiers of the DV-BMI association. Violence victimization was not associated with BMI among men. CONCLUSIONS: Screening and support for DV victims, especially women who have also experienced childhood maltreatment, may be warranted to reduce the likelihood of health consequences associated with victimization.",
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AU - Mason, Susan M

AU - Connett, John E

AU - Henderson, Kimberly M.

AU - To, Michelle

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AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study tested whether dating violence (DV) victimization is associated with increases in BMI across the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and whether gender and previous exposure to child maltreatment modify such increases. METHODS: Data were from participants (N = 9295; 49.9% female) in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight at waves 2, 3, and 4 of the study. DV victimization was measured at waves 2, 3, and 4 by using items from the revised Conflict Tactics Scales. Linear regression by using generalized estimating equations with robust SEs was used to test the association. Models were stratified according to gender and history of child maltreatment. RESULTS: From baseline to wave 4, BMI increased on average 6.5 units (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.2-6.7) and 6.8 units (95% CI: 6.5-7.1) among men and women, respectively, and nearly one-half (45.5% of men; 43.9% of women) reported DV at some point. In stratified models, DV victimization (b: 0.3 [95% CI: 0.0-0.6]) independently predicted BMI increase over time in women. Exposure to childhood sexual abuse magnified the increase in BMI associated with DV victimization (b: 1.3 [95% CI: 0.3-2.3]). No other types of childhood maltreatment were significant modifiers of the DV-BMI association. Violence victimization was not associated with BMI among men. CONCLUSIONS: Screening and support for DV victims, especially women who have also experienced childhood maltreatment, may be warranted to reduce the likelihood of health consequences associated with victimization.

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