Cytomegalovirus-induced pathology in human temporal bones with congenital and acquired infection

Vladimir Tsuprun, Nevra Keskin, Mark R. Schleiss, Pat Schachern, Sebahattin Cureoglu

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Publications on histopathology of human temporal bones with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection are limited. We aim to determine histopathology of the inner ears and the middle ears in human temporal bones with congenital and acquired CMV infections. Methods: Temporal bones from 2 infants with congenital and 2 adults with acquired CMV infection were evaluated by light microscopy. Results: Two infants with congenital CMV infection showed striking pathological changes in the inner ear. There was a hypervascularization of the stria vascularis in the cochlea of the first infant, but no obvious loss of outer and inner hair cells was seen in the organ of Corti. However, cytomegalic cells and a loss of outer hair cells were found in the cochlea of the second infant. The vestibular organs of both infants showed cytomegalic cells, mostly located on dark cells. There was a loss of type I and type II hair cells in the macula of the saccule and utricle. Loss of hair cells and degeneration of nerve fibers was also seen in the semicircular canals. Both infants with congenital infection showed abundant inflammatory cells and fibrous structures in the middle ear cavity. No evidence of cytomegalic cells and hair cell loss was found in the cochlea or vestibular labyrinth in acquired CMV infection. Conclusions: In two infants with congenital CMV infection, the cochlea, vestibule, and middle ear were highly affected. Temporal bones of adult donors with acquired viral infection showed histological findings similar to donors of the same age without ear disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102270
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank Dr. Joseph Nadol from the Otopathology Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA for providing archival human temporal bones of two infants with congenital cytomegalovirus infection for this study. This study was funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, U24 DC011968 grant; the International Hearing Foundation; a Masonic Children's Hospital Cross-Departmental Grant provided by the University of Minnesota Medical School's Department of Pediatrics; the 5M Lions International Grant; the Starkey Hearing Foundation; and the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. The article does not include any studies with human participants performed by any of authors. The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Funding Information:
This study was funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders , U24 DC011968 grant; the International Hearing Foundation ; a Masonic Children's Hospital Cross-Departmental Grant provided by the University of Minnesota Medical School's Department of Pediatrics; the 5M Lions International Grant; the Starkey Hearing Foundation ; and the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey . The article does not include any studies with human participants performed by any of authors. The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Cochlea
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Histopathology
  • Human temporal bones
  • Middle ear
  • Vestibular system

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