Cytomegalovirus-induced pathology in human temporal bones with congenital and acquired infection

Vladimir Tsuprun, Nevra Keskin, Mark R. Schleiss, Pat Schachern, Sebahattin Cureoglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Publications on histopathology of human temporal bones with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection are limited. We aim to determine histopathology of the inner ears and the middle ears in human temporal bones with congenital and acquired CMV infections. Methods: Temporal bones from 2 infants with congenital and 2 adults with acquired CMV infection were evaluated by light microscopy. Results: Two infants with congenital CMV infection showed striking pathological changes in the inner ear. There was a hypervascularization of the stria vascularis in the cochlea of the first infant, but no obvious loss of outer and inner hair cells was seen in the organ of Corti. However, cytomegalic cells and a loss of outer hair cells were found in the cochlea of the second infant. The vestibular organs of both infants showed cytomegalic cells, mostly located on dark cells. There was a loss of type I and type II hair cells in the macula of the saccule and utricle. Loss of hair cells and degeneration of nerve fibers was also seen in the semicircular canals. Both infants with congenital infection showed abundant inflammatory cells and fibrous structures in the middle ear cavity. No evidence of cytomegalic cells and hair cell loss was found in the cochlea or vestibular labyrinth in acquired CMV infection. Conclusions: In two infants with congenital CMV infection, the cochlea, vestibule, and middle ear were highly affected. Temporal bones of adult donors with acquired viral infection showed histological findings similar to donors of the same age without ear disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102270
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

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Temporal Bone
Cytomegalovirus
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Pathology
Cochlea
Infection
Outer Auditory Hair Cells
Middle Ear
Labyrinth Vestibule
Alopecia
Inner Ear
Inner Auditory Hair Cells
Tissue Donors
Stria Vascularis
Saccule and Utricle
Ear Diseases
Organ of Corti
Semicircular Canals
Virus Diseases
Nerve Fibers

Keywords

  • Cochlea
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Histopathology
  • Human temporal bones
  • Middle ear
  • Vestibular system

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Cytomegalovirus-induced pathology in human temporal bones with congenital and acquired infection. / Tsuprun, Vladimir; Keskin, Nevra; Schleiss, Mark R.; Schachern, Pat; Cureoglu, Sebahattin.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 40, No. 6, 102270, 01.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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