Cytomegalovirus Disease in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in the Nontransplant Setting: Case Series and Review of the Literature

Aliakbar Rahbarimanesh, Mohammadali Ehsani, Maedeh Karahroudi, Armin Rashidi, Motahareh Aghajani, Alipasha Meysami, Elham Shahgholi, Azim Mehrvar, Maryam Tashvighi, Hossein Keyvani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the nontransplant setting is very rare. We report our experience with 4 such cases, and review the literature (n=12). The median age at diagnosis was 10 years and 50% of patients were males. Among the 11 cases with available information at the time of diagnosis, CMV disease occurred during maintenance therapy in 10 patients. Fever was present in 9 cases. CMV disease manifested as retinitis in 6, hepatosplenic disease in 3, pneumonitis in 1, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in 1 patient. One patient had both CMV retinitis and CMV-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Four of the 7 patients with retinitis complained of visual disturbance at diagnosis. CMV viremia was present in 10 patients. Three patients had at least 1 relapse and developed permanent visual defects, and 1 patient developed recurrent retinal detachment. In conclusion, prolonged immunosuppression is the major etiology and retinitis is the most common manifestation of CMV disease. As a significant number of patients with retinitis are asymptomatic, early diagnosis and treatment is important to prevent permanent visual loss. ©

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-432
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of pediatric hematology/oncology
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 6 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • CMV
  • ganciclovir
  • leukemia
  • lymphoblastic
  • retinitis
  • valganciclovir

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cytomegalovirus Disease in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in the Nontransplant Setting: Case Series and Review of the Literature'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this