Cuprizone does not induce CNS demyelination in nonhuman primates

Zhihong Chen, Jacqueline T. Chen, Matthew Johnson, Zachary C. Gossman, Megan Hendrickson, Ken Sakaie, Clarissa Martinez-Rubio, John T. Gale, Bruce D. Trapp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cognitive decline is a common symptom in multiple sclerosis patients, with profound effects on the quality of life. A nonhuman primate model of multiple sclerosis would be best suited to test the effects of demyelination on complex cognitive functions such as learning and reasoning. Cuprizone has been shown to reliably induce brain demyelination in mice. To establish a nonhuman primate model of multiple sclerosis, young adult cynomolgus monkeys were administered cuprizone per os as a dietary supplement. The subjects received increasing cuprizone doses (0.3–3% of diet) for up to 18 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging and immunohistological analyses did not reveal demyelination in these monkeys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-213
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This investigation was supported by an imaging pilot fund from the Department of Radiology at the Cleveland Clinic (to J. T. C.) and by a pilot grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (PP1866 to B. D. T.).

Funding Information:
We thank Christopher L. Nelson for scientific discussion and editorial support, Timothy Myshrall for advice, and Derrek Tew for technical support. This investigation was supported by an imaging pilot fund from the Department of Radiology at the Cleveland Clinic (to J. T. C.) and by a pilot grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (PP1866 to B. D. T.).

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