Cross-sectional assessment of medical and nursing students' attitudes toward chronic illness at matriculation and graduation.

Christine A. Arenson, Susan Rattner, Cecilia Borden, Lauren Collins, Sylvia K. Fields, Emily Gavin, J. Jon Veloski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: It is important to assess students' attitudes toward chronic illness to enhance curriculum and support interprofessional learning. METHOD: A 40-item questionnaire was administered to 704 medical and nursing students. Qualitative and quantitative analyses examined their attitudes and understanding of chronic illness as well as differences between medical and nursing students. RESULTS: Content analysis and factor analysis indicated that entering students were more positive about chronic illness than graduates. Most underestimated its economic impact. Positive attitudes toward chronic illness were associated with taking a personal interest in patients. The attitudes of nursing students were generally similar to those of medical students, but there were differences related to patient adherence, the role of nurses in patient education, managing comorbidities, and confidentiality of electronic medical records. CONCLUSIONS: Entering students were more positive about chronic illness than graduates. Although medical and nursing students' attitudes were very similar, differences have implications for interprofessional education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S93-96
JournalAcademic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Volume83
Issue number10 Suppl
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

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