CRIME, ENTREPRENEURSHIP, AND LABOR FORCE WITHDRAWAL

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    15 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This article explores the links between self‐admitted drug dealing and labor force behavior to determine if and/or how returns to employment influence the decisions by both blacks and whites to enter drug dealing. Using data collected on inmates in prisons and jails in California, Michigan, and Texas, this analysis concludes that black and white offenders vastly differ in their perceptions of criminal opportunities. But the dominant factor contributing to entry into drug selling, especially among black males, is unattractive market opportunities. One cannot determine unambiguously whether this results from the lure of drug dealing for its entrepreneurial attractiveness or simply results from crime versus employment choices. In any case, evidence presented clearly shows that racial differences in returns to employment explain most of the gap between black and white drug dealing.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)84-97
    Number of pages14
    JournalContemporary Economic Policy
    Volume10
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1992

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