Creating and using domain-specific language features

Ted Kaminski, Eric Van Wyk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The value that domain-specific languages provide to their users is the domain-specific language features they contain. These features provide notations from the domain of interest, as well as domain-specific analysis and optimizations. But domain-specific languages are sometimes a poor means of delivering these valuable features to their users. A challenge arises when a problem crosses multiple domains and whose programming or modeling solution could benefit from language features from all domains of interest. Using multiple domain-specific languages can become cumbersome, perhaps outweighing their benefits in the first place. An alternative approach, advocated by this position paper, is to provide domain-specific language features to programmers and modelers as composable language extensions that they can import into their general-purpose programming or modeling language. In our view, there are three requirements for a language extension framework to be widely usable. First, language extensions should be developed independently, by domain-experts, as libraries or domain-specific languages are now. Second, extensions should be automatically composable so that programmers and modelers can pick the language extensions they want, and direct tools to compose them, without the need for writing "glue-code." Third, this composition process should not fail to yield a working compiler (or other tools) for the custom extended language. Thus, the programmer has some assurance that the extensions that they pick will work together. We briefly describe how this vision of extensible language frameworks is supported by the Silver and Copper metaprogramming tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1st Workshop on the Globalization of Domain Specific Languages, GlobalDSL 2013
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages18-21
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781450320436
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Event1st Workshop on the Globalization of Domain Specific Languages, GlobalDSL 2013 - Montpellier, France
Duration: Jul 1 2013Jul 1 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 1st Workshop on the Globalization of Domain Specific Languages, GlobalDSL 2013

Other

Other1st Workshop on the Globalization of Domain Specific Languages, GlobalDSL 2013
CountryFrance
CityMontpellier
Period7/1/137/1/13

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