COVID-19 and Persons With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Implications for Future Policy, Practice, and Research

Amy S. Hewitt, John G. Smith, Liz Weintraub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has been hard for everyone. For the estimated seven and a half million people in the United States who live with intellectual disability (Residential Information Systems Project, 2020), it has been very hard. Lives have been disrupted by lost jobs, lack of access to friends/family, and challenges finding enough staff to provide supports and needed healthcare. Studies have shown that people with IDD are at a much greater risk of getting COVID-19 and dying from it (Cuypers et al., 2020; Gleason et al., 2021; Kaye, 2021; Landes, Turk, & Ervin, 2020; Nygren & Lulinski, 2020). Without question, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) struggled as the COVID-19 pandemic began and as it has continued. Too many were isolated from friends and family for far too long. Too many were lonely and bored. Too many have not received the support they have needed during the pandemic. Far too many were denied treatment and far too many have died. As a nation we must reflect on what has happened and listen to people with IDD and their families about their experiences. This commentary reflects on the implications of COVID-19 for research, policy, and practice through the lens of people with IDD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-277
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities
Volume127
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 American Association on Mental Retardation. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • community living
  • developmental disabilities
  • intellectual disability

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