Could ralph nader's entrance and exit have helped al gore? The impact of decoy dynamics on consumer choice

William M Hedgcock, Akshay R Rao, Haipeng Allan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People are frequently faced with making a new choice decision after a preferred option becomes unavailable. Prior research on the attraction effect has demonstrated how the introduction of an option into a choice set increases the share of one of the original options. The authors examine the related but previously unaddressed issue of whether the unexpected exit of an option from a choice set returns the choice shares of the original options to the status quo. In a series of experiments, they observe that when an option turns out to be unselectable following a choice problem in which it was selectable, the choice shares of the remaining options are predictably different from those of a choice problem in which the option was unselectable from the start. They also observe that this attraction effect due to the disappearance of a decoy is likely a consequence of changes in the importance of decision criteria. They conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-343
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Marketing Research
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

Consumer choice
Exit
Choice sets
Attraction effect
Status quo
Decision criteria
Experiment

Keywords

  • Consumer choice
  • Decoy effect
  • Phantom decoy
  • Political choice

Cite this

Could ralph nader's entrance and exit have helped al gore? The impact of decoy dynamics on consumer choice. / Hedgcock, William M; Rao, Akshay R; Chen, Haipeng Allan.

In: Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.06.2009, p. 330-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{32d8ff8c5e474b02bc1895a54fe3e18e,
title = "Could ralph nader's entrance and exit have helped al gore? The impact of decoy dynamics on consumer choice",
abstract = "People are frequently faced with making a new choice decision after a preferred option becomes unavailable. Prior research on the attraction effect has demonstrated how the introduction of an option into a choice set increases the share of one of the original options. The authors examine the related but previously unaddressed issue of whether the unexpected exit of an option from a choice set returns the choice shares of the original options to the status quo. In a series of experiments, they observe that when an option turns out to be unselectable following a choice problem in which it was selectable, the choice shares of the remaining options are predictably different from those of a choice problem in which the option was unselectable from the start. They also observe that this attraction effect due to the disappearance of a decoy is likely a consequence of changes in the importance of decision criteria. They conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the research.",
keywords = "Consumer choice, Decoy effect, Phantom decoy, Political choice",
author = "Hedgcock, {William M} and Rao, {Akshay R} and Chen, {Haipeng Allan}",
year = "2009",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1509/jmkr.46.3.330",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "330--343",
journal = "Journal of Marketing Research",
issn = "0022-2437",
publisher = "American Marketing Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Could ralph nader's entrance and exit have helped al gore? The impact of decoy dynamics on consumer choice

AU - Hedgcock, William M

AU - Rao, Akshay R

AU - Chen, Haipeng Allan

PY - 2009/6/1

Y1 - 2009/6/1

N2 - People are frequently faced with making a new choice decision after a preferred option becomes unavailable. Prior research on the attraction effect has demonstrated how the introduction of an option into a choice set increases the share of one of the original options. The authors examine the related but previously unaddressed issue of whether the unexpected exit of an option from a choice set returns the choice shares of the original options to the status quo. In a series of experiments, they observe that when an option turns out to be unselectable following a choice problem in which it was selectable, the choice shares of the remaining options are predictably different from those of a choice problem in which the option was unselectable from the start. They also observe that this attraction effect due to the disappearance of a decoy is likely a consequence of changes in the importance of decision criteria. They conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the research.

AB - People are frequently faced with making a new choice decision after a preferred option becomes unavailable. Prior research on the attraction effect has demonstrated how the introduction of an option into a choice set increases the share of one of the original options. The authors examine the related but previously unaddressed issue of whether the unexpected exit of an option from a choice set returns the choice shares of the original options to the status quo. In a series of experiments, they observe that when an option turns out to be unselectable following a choice problem in which it was selectable, the choice shares of the remaining options are predictably different from those of a choice problem in which the option was unselectable from the start. They also observe that this attraction effect due to the disappearance of a decoy is likely a consequence of changes in the importance of decision criteria. They conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the research.

KW - Consumer choice

KW - Decoy effect

KW - Phantom decoy

KW - Political choice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=68649101795&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=68649101795&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1509/jmkr.46.3.330

DO - 10.1509/jmkr.46.3.330

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 330

EP - 343

JO - Journal of Marketing Research

JF - Journal of Marketing Research

SN - 0022-2437

IS - 3

ER -