Could ralph nader's entrance and exit have helped al gore? The impact of decoy dynamics on consumer choice

William Hedgcock, Akshay R. Rao, Haipeng Allan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

People are frequently faced with making a new choice decision after a preferred option becomes unavailable. Prior research on the attraction effect has demonstrated how the introduction of an option into a choice set increases the share of one of the original options. The authors examine the related but previously unaddressed issue of whether the unexpected exit of an option from a choice set returns the choice shares of the original options to the status quo. In a series of experiments, they observe that when an option turns out to be unselectable following a choice problem in which it was selectable, the choice shares of the remaining options are predictably different from those of a choice problem in which the option was unselectable from the start. They also observe that this attraction effect due to the disappearance of a decoy is likely a consequence of changes in the importance of decision criteria. They conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-343
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Marketing Research
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Consumer choice
  • Decoy effect
  • Phantom decoy
  • Political choice

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Could ralph nader's entrance and exit have helped al gore? The impact of decoy dynamics on consumer choice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this