Cost analysis of commercial pasteurization of orange juice by pulsed electric fields

Fernando Sampedro, A. McAloon, W. Yee, X. Fan, H. Q. Zhang, D. J. Geveke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cost of pulsed electric field (PEF) pasteurization of orange juice was estimated. The cost analysis was based on processing conditions that met the US FDA (5 log reduction) requirement for fruit juice pasteurization and that achieved a sufficient microbial shelf-life. PEF-treated samples processed at 30 kV/cm and 60 C had reductions in Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Lactobacillus spp. of greater than 5 log and had a microbial shelf-life of 2 months at 4 C. Total pasteurization cost was estimated to be 3.7 ¢/L. Of this, capital costs accounted for 54% (2.0 ¢/L), labor costs accounted for 35% (1.3 ¢/L) and utility charges, mainly electricity, accounted for 11% (0.4 ¢/L). The total PEF cost was 147% (2.2 ¢/L) more than that of conventional thermal processing (1.5 ¢/L). A deeper knowledge of the processing costs of PEF technology will afford companies a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of nonthermal processing. Industrial relevance: Pasteurization of orange juice by pulsed electric fields (PEF) results in a higher quality product compared to traditional thermal pasteurization. However, industry has not embraced this new technology and the main reason for this may be the lack of a comprehensive cost analysis. A large-scale commercial PEF system was designed and the total pasteurization cost was estimated to be 3.7 ¢/L. The total PEF cost was 2.2 ¢/L more than that of traditional thermal processing. A thorough knowledge of the processing costs will provide companies with a better understanding of the pros and cons of PEF pasteurization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-78
Number of pages7
JournalInnovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Pasteurization
cost analysis
pulsed electric fields
orange juice
pasteurization
Electric fields
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs
Hot Temperature
shelf life
Processing
nonthermal processing
heat treatment
fruit juices
electricity
Fruit juices
Technology
Salmonella Typhimurium
product quality
Lactobacillus

Keywords

  • Cost analysis
  • Energy
  • Orange juice
  • Pulsed electric fields

Cite this

Cost analysis of commercial pasteurization of orange juice by pulsed electric fields. / Sampedro, Fernando; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.; Fan, X.; Zhang, H. Q.; Geveke, D. J.

In: Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, Vol. 17, 01.01.2013, p. 72-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sampedro, Fernando ; McAloon, A. ; Yee, W. ; Fan, X. ; Zhang, H. Q. ; Geveke, D. J. / Cost analysis of commercial pasteurization of orange juice by pulsed electric fields. In: Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies. 2013 ; Vol. 17. pp. 72-78.
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