Cortical VIP neurons locally control the gain but globally control the coherence of gamma band rhythms

Julia Veit, Gregory Handy, Daniel P. Mossing, Brent Doiron, Hillel Adesnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gamma band synchronization can facilitate local and long-range neural communication. In the primary visual cortex, visual stimulus properties within a specific location determine local synchronization strength, while the match of stimulus properties between distant locations controls long-range synchronization. The neural basis for the differential control of local and global gamma band synchronization is unknown. Combining electrophysiology, optogenetics, and computational modeling, we found that VIP disinhibitory interneurons in mouse cortex linearly scale gamma power locally without changing its stimulus tuning. Conversely, they suppress long-range synchronization when two regions process non-matched stimuli, tuning gamma coherence globally. Modeling shows that like-to-like connectivity across space and specific VIP→SST inhibition capture these opposing effects. VIP neurons thus differentially impact local and global properties of gamma rhythms depending on visual stimulus statistics. They may thereby construct gamma-band filters for spatially extended but continuous image features, such as contours, facilitating the downstream generation of coherent visual percepts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-417.e5
JournalNeuron
Volume111
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the New York Stem Cell Foundation . H.A. is a New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator. This work was supported by NEI grant R01EY023756 and NINDS grant U19NS107613 . B.D. was supported by NIH grants 1U19NS107613–01 and R01 EB026953 , the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship # N00014-18-1-2002 , and a grant from the Simons Foundation collaboration on the global brain. J.V. was supported by an Emmy Noether grant from the DFG ( VE 938/2-1 ). G.H. was supported by the Swartz Foundation Fellowship for Theory in Neuroscience and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund’s Career Award at the Scientific Interface.

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the New York Stem Cell Foundation. H.A. is a New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator. This work was supported by NEI grant R01EY023756 and NINDS grant U19NS107613. B.D. was supported by NIH grants 1U19NS107613–01 and R01 EB026953, the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship #N00014-18-1-2002, and a grant from the Simons Foundation collaboration on the global brain. J.V. was supported by an Emmy Noether grant from the DFG (VE 938/2-1). G.H. was supported by the Swartz Foundation Fellowship for Theory in Neuroscience and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund's Career Award at the Scientific Interface. Conceptualization, H.A. J.V. G.H. and B.D.; investigation, J.V. D.P.M. and G.H.; formal analysis, J.V. and D.P.M.; methodology, B.D. and G.H.; writing – original draft, H.A. and B.D.; writing – review & editing, H.A. J.V. B.D. G.H. and D.P.M.; visualization, J.V. and G.H.; funding acquisition, H.A. and B.D.; resources, H.A. and B.D. The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • VIP
  • binding
  • coherence
  • gamma
  • inhibition
  • neocortex
  • neural circuit
  • optogenetics
  • oscillation
  • rhythm
  • synchrony
  • visual cortex

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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