Corrigendum to “Functional maturation in visual pathways predicts attention to the eyes in infant rhesus macaques: Effects of social status” [Dev. Cogn. Neurosci., 60 C (2023): 101213] (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (2023) 60, (S187892932300018X), (10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101213))

Aiden Ford, Zsofia A. Kovacs-Balint, Arick Wang, Eric Feczko, Eric Earl, Óscar Miranda-Domínguez, Longchuan Li, Martin Styner, Damien Fair, Warren Jones, Jocelyne Bachevalier, Mar M. Sánchez

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

The authors regret an error in a data analysis script used for the manuscript, “Functional maturation in visual pathways predicts attention to the eyes in infant rhesus macaques: Effects of social status”. The authors identified an error that resulted in the computation of confidence bands at 90% intervals versus at 95% intervals (as was stated in the manuscript). The confidence bands have been recomputed, and the data has been reanalyzed. This correction changed the descriptive results of a minor analysis that isolated periods of time when the rates of change for the trajectories of functional connectivity and eye-looking were significantly positive or negative (described in 3.1 Functional connectivity in the visual object pathway and 3.2 Developmental change in attention to the eyes) as well as the confidence bands for trajectories plotted inFigs. 2,3 and 4. These corrections did not affect the main interpretations or conclusions from the results of the analyses presented in this manuscript. Corrections to the values reported in the manuscript and to the data visualized in Figs. 2–4 are described in this corrigendum and the authors sincerely apologize for any inconvenience. In section 3.1 Functional connectivity in the visual object pathway: 1. The earliest age at which functional connectivity between V1 and V3 was significantly left lateralized should be reported as 90 days (3 months).2. The ages at which strengthening functional connectivity between V1 to V3 had a significantly positive rate of change should be 15–136 days in the left hemisphere (0.5–4.5 months, first measurement at 15 days (0.5 months)) and 71–123 days (2.4–4.1 months) in the right hemisphere.3. The ages at which decreasing functional connectivity between TEO to TEp had a significantly negative rate of change should be 35–49 days (1.2–1.6 months) in the right hemisphere. There were no days when the rate of change for functional connectivity in the left hemisphere was significantly negative.4. The ages at which increasing functional connectivity between TEp and AMY had a significantly positive rate of change should be 15–61 days in the left hemisphere (0.5–2.0 months) and 15–78 days (0.5–2.6 months) in the right hemisphere.In section 3.2 Developmental change in attention to the eyes: 1. The ages at which infant macaque attention to the eyes had a significantly positive rate of change should be 21–33 days (0.7–1.1 months).Two additional in-text corrections are that Supplemental Figures 3 and 4 should be labeled as Supplemental Figures 2 and 3, both in the main manuscript (3.4 Exploratory brain-behavior associations and 4.3 Accelerated trajectories of eye-looking are predicted by functional connectivity between the visual areas and social rank) and in Appendix A. Supplementary material. Finally, corrected Figs. 2, 3, and 4 are included. Figure captions have been reproduced in this corrigendum from the original manuscript for ease of reference.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101364
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

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