Correlations between family meals and psychosocial well-being among adolescents

Marla E. Eisenberg, Rachel E. Olson, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Mary Story, Linda H. Bearinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

250 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the association between frequency of family meals and multiple indicators of adolescent health and well-being (tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; academic performance; self-esteem; depressive symptoms; and suicide involvement) after controlling for family connectedness. Methods: Data come from a 1998-1999 school-based survey of 4746 adolescents from ethnically and socio-economically diverse communities in the Minneapolis/St Paul, Minn, metropolitan area. Logistic regression, controlling for family connectedness and sociodemographic variables, was used to identify relationships between family meals and adolescent health behaviors. Results: Approximately one quarter (26.8%) of respondents ate 7 or more family meals in the past week, and approximately one quarter (23.1%) ate family meals 2 times or less. Frequency of family meals was inversely associated with tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; low grade point average; depressive symptoms; and suicide involvement after controlling for family connectedness (odds ratios, 0.76-0.93). Conclusions: Findings suggest that eating family meals may enhance the health and well-being of adolescents. Public education on the benefits of family mealtime is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)792-796
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume158
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

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Child Welfare
Meals
Cannabis
Suicide
Tobacco
Alcohols
Depression
Adolescent Behavior
Family Health
Health Behavior
Self Concept
Eating
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Education
Health

Cite this

Correlations between family meals and psychosocial well-being among adolescents. / Eisenberg, Marla E.; Olson, Rachel E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary; Bearinger, Linda H.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 158, No. 8, 01.08.2004, p. 792-796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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