Correlates of weight-related quality of life among individuals with binge eating disorder before and after cognitive behavioral therapy

Tyler B. Mason, Ross D. Crosby, Ronette L. Kolotkin, Carlos M. Grilo, James E. Mitchell, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Scott J. Crow, Carol B. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individuals with obesity and binge eating disorder (BED) report poorer weight-related quality of life (WRQOL) compared to individuals with obesity alone. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), the best available treatment for BED, does not consistently produce weight loss or improvements in weight QOL. The purpose of the current study was to examine baseline and longitudinal associations between eating-related and psychosocial variables and dimensions of weight QOL. We examined associations between predictor variables, including body mass index (BMI), eating disorder (ED) psychopathology, and psychosocial factors, in relation to three dimensions of WRQOL among 171 patients whom received CBT for BED. Participants completed interviews and self-report measures at baseline prior to CBT and at end of treatment. At baseline the following associations were significant: BMI, ED psychopathology, and self-esteem were associated with weight-related self-esteem; gender, BMI, and self-esteem were associated with weight-related public distress (i.e., stigma and worry in public because of one's weight); and age, BMI, and ED psychopathology were associated with weight-related physical function. At end of treatment, the following associations were significant: changes in ED psychopathology and coping predicted weight-related self-esteem; changes in coping and self-esteem predicted weight-related public distress; and changes in BMI and subjective binge eating predicted weight-related physical function. Overall, changes in a number of ED and associated symptoms were associated with improvements in WRQOL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume27
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by grants T32MH082761 from the National Institute of Mental Health and R01DK61912 , R01DK61973 , and P30DK60456 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases . The authors are solely responsible for the study design and collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Elsevier Ltd

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Binge eating disorder
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Obesity
  • Quality of life

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