Correlates of body fat distribution. Variation across categories of race, sex, and body mass in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

Bruce B. Duncan, L. E. Chambless, Maria Ines Schmidt, Moyses Szklo, Aaron R. Folsom, Myra A. Carpenter, John R. Crouse, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Though central adiposity is a strong, independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, relatively little is known about its determinants. To characterize the association of central adiposity with several of its possible determinants, while describing variability in these associations across sex, race, and level of body mass index, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 15,800 white and African-American men and women ages 45 to 64 years participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities baseline survey, 1987 to 1989. After adjustment for other possible determinants, African Americans had markedly larger subscapular skinfold thicknesses and subscapular/triceps ratios than did whites, while whites had larger waist/hip ratios. Large, statistically significant variations in waist/hip ratio associations with age, percent of weight gained after age 25, smoking, and physical activity in the workplace existed across categories of sex, race, and body mass index. Based on our findings, we concluded that major variation exists in the waist/hip ratio and in its associations with its possible determinants across categories of race, sex, and obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-200
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of epidemiology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Body Fat Distribution
Waist-Hip Ratio
Atherosclerosis
Adiposity
African Americans
Body Mass Index
Skinfold Thickness
Workplace
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • exercise
  • fat distribution
  • population study
  • race
  • sex
  • smoking

Cite this

Duncan, B. B., Chambless, L. E., Schmidt, M. I., Szklo, M., Folsom, A. R., Carpenter, M. A., ... The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators, A. R. I. C. ARIC. S. I. (1995). Correlates of body fat distribution. Variation across categories of race, sex, and body mass in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Annals of epidemiology, 5(3), 192-200. https://doi.org/10.1016/1047-2797(94)00106-4

Correlates of body fat distribution. Variation across categories of race, sex, and body mass in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. / Duncan, Bruce B.; Chambless, L. E.; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Szklo, Moyses; Folsom, Aaron R.; Carpenter, Myra A.; Crouse, John R.; The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators.

In: Annals of epidemiology, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.01.1995, p. 192-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duncan, BB, Chambless, LE, Schmidt, MI, Szklo, M, Folsom, AR, Carpenter, MA, Crouse, JR & The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators, ARICARICSI 1995, 'Correlates of body fat distribution. Variation across categories of race, sex, and body mass in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study', Annals of epidemiology, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 192-200. https://doi.org/10.1016/1047-2797(94)00106-4
Duncan, Bruce B. ; Chambless, L. E. ; Schmidt, Maria Ines ; Szklo, Moyses ; Folsom, Aaron R. ; Carpenter, Myra A. ; Crouse, John R. ; The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators. / Correlates of body fat distribution. Variation across categories of race, sex, and body mass in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. In: Annals of epidemiology. 1995 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 192-200.
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