Coping with intergenerational family conflict: Comparison of Asian American, Hispanic, and European American college students

Richard M. Lee, Hsin Tine Tina Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

111 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a stress-coping framework, the authors examined indirect and direct coping strategies as potential mediators in the relationship between intergenerational family conflict and psychological distress in Asian American, Hispanic, and European American college students. Asian American college students reported the highest likelihood of family conflict. Students from all cultural groups also used direct coping slightly more often than they did indirect coping. Only indirect coping mediated the effect of family conflict on distress for Asian Americans and European Americans, but it did so in the opposite direction than hypothesized. For these two cultural groups, indirect coping fully accounted for the variance shared between family conflict and psychological distress. For Hispanics, indirect coping partially mediated the effect of family conflict on psychological distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-419
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2001

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