Coping styles and self-regulation predict complementary and alternative medicine and herbal supplement use among college students

Rick A. Lacaille, Nicholas J. Kuvaas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies have suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use may be high on college campuses. This study investigated the relationship between CAM and herbal supplement utilization and coping, self-regulatory, cognitive styles, and healthcare satisfaction among college students (n=370). Indeed, overall CAM and herbal supplement use during the past year appeared high; however, users of these practices appeared somewhat heterogeneous. Dispositional factors were predictive of utilization with active coping style associated with both practices, whereas support-seeking and intrinsic self-regulation were only associated with CAM use and avoidant coping was only related to use of herbal supplements. Notably, dissatisfaction with healthcare services was not associated with either CAM or herbal supplement use among students. The findings from this study offer insight regarding motives for usage that may assist in more openly dialoguing with students regarding their health-enhancing and/or health-compromising behaviors. Moreover, future studies assessing utilization of CAM will benefit from examining the definitional issues of CAM practices that are addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-332
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Keywords

  • alternative medicine
  • coping
  • herbal supplements
  • self-regulation

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