Coping strategies in bulimia nervosa treatment: Impact on outcome in group cognitive-behavioral therapy

Roslyn B. Binford, Ross D. Crosby, Melissa Pederson Mussell, Carol B. Peterson, Scott J. Crow, James E. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study's purpose was to examine the extent to which participants (N = 143) receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (BN) reported implementing therapeutic strategies to abstain from BN behaviors, and to assess whether use of specific strategies predicts outcome at treatment end and 1-and 6-month follow-up. Frequency of outcome expectancies (OE), stimulus-response prevention (SRP), and social support-seeking (SSS) strategies significantly increased by end of treatment. By 1-month follow-up, use of SSS, not OE or SRP, declined significantly relative to treatment end. Although frequency of coping strategy use at treatment end did not predict 1-month BN symptom remission, SSS use at 1-month follow-up predicted 6-month remission. Findings highlight the importance of social support to maintain treatment gains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1089-1096
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Bulimia nervosa
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Therapeutic strategies

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