Coordinated Reset Deep Brain Stimulation of Subthalamic Nucleus Produces Long-Lasting, Dose-Dependent Motor Improvements in the 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine Non-Human Primate Model of Parkinsonism

Jing Wang, Shane Nebeck, Abirami Muralidharan, Matthew D. Johnson, Jerrold L. Vitek, Kenneth B. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) paradigms are being explored in an effort to further optimize therapeutic outcome for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). One approach, termed 'Coordinated Reset' (CR) DBS, was developed to target pathological oscillatory network activity. with desynchronizing effects and associated therapeutic benefit hypothesized to endure beyond cessation of stimulus delivery. Objective To characterize the acute and carry-over effects of low-intensity CR DBS versus traditional DBS (tDBS) in the region of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Methods A within-subject, block treatment design involving the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) non-human primate model of parkinsonism was used. Each treatment block consisted of five days of daily DBS delivery followed by a one week minimum post-treatment observation window. Motor behavior was quantified using a modified rating scale for both animals combined with an objective, upper-extremity reach task in one animal. Results Both animals demonstrated significant motor improvements during acute tDBS; however, within-session and post-treatment carry-over was limited. Acute motor improvements were also observed in response to low-intensity CR DBS; however, both within- and between-session therapeutic carry-over enhanced progressively following each daily treatment. Moreover, in contrast to tDBS, five consecutive days of CR DBS treatment yielded carry-over benefits that persisted for up to two weeks without additional intervention. Notably, the magnitude and time-course of CR DBS' effects on each animal varied with daily dose-duration, pointing to possible interaction effects involving baseline parkinsonian severity. Conclusion Our results support the therapeutic promise of CR DBS for PD, including its potential to induce carryover while reducing both side effect risk and hardware power consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-617
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Stimulation
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • Coordinated reset
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • MPTP
  • Neuromodulation
  • Rhesus macaque

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