Cool-season turfgrass color and growth habit response to elevated levels of ultraviolet-B radiation

Edward J. Nangle, David S. Gardner, James D. Metzger, Dominic P. Petrella, Tom K. Danneberger, Luis Rodriguez-Saona, John L. Cisar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation poses a potential stress for plant growth and development due to its effect on photosynthesis and plant productivity. In the northern hemisphere, peak UV radiation exposure is predicted to occur from 2010 to 2020, with reduced color from UV-related injury, a possibility for turfgrasses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light on turfgrass growth and morphology in three coolseason grasses. Cultivars Barvado tall fescue [Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort., nom. cons.], Penncross and L-93 creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.), and Barlenium perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), were selected because of limited information on their growth and development in elevated UV conditions at heights of cut above 10 cm. The impact of UV-B light treatment on color, relative growth rate, and tillering was measured over a 4-week period in repeated experiments. Ultraviolet-B radiation levels were measured at 16 kJ·m-2·d-1 biologically effective UV-B light in growth chambers programmed for a day/night regime of 14/10 hours. Chamber temperatures were maintained at 20°C day/ 17°C night. Ultraviolet-B light significantly inhibited tiller production in the first experiment in all grasses except PR, whereas no grasses were inhibited in the second experiment. Relative growth rates in all grasses were significantly lower in UV-B conditions 3 weeks after treatment initiation. Turfgrasses exposed to this level of UV-B light at typical lawn heights-of-cut had lower color ratings compared with the non-UV-Btreated control at 2 weeks after treatment initiation. The experiments demonstrated that exposure to UV-B resulted in a decline of growth rate and color in cool-season turfgrasses within a timeframe of 2 weeks. Coarse-textured turfgrasses [tall fescue (TF)/perennial ryegrass (PR)] may be more adapted to higher UV-B conditions due to morphological differences compared with the finer textured varieties [creeping bentgrass (CB)].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-443
Number of pages5
JournalHortScience
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Agrostis stolonifera
  • Home lawn
  • Lolium perenne
  • Schedonorus arundinaceaus
  • Turfgrass growth and development
  • Ultraviolet radiation

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    Nangle, E. J., Gardner, D. S., Metzger, J. D., Petrella, D. P., Danneberger, T. K., Rodriguez-Saona, L., & Cisar, J. L. (2016). Cool-season turfgrass color and growth habit response to elevated levels of ultraviolet-B radiation. HortScience, 51(4), 439-443. https://doi.org/10.21273/hortsci.51.4.439