Cooking methods for red meats and risk of type 2 diabetes: A prospective study of u.s. women

Gang Liu, Geng Zong, Frank B. Hu, Walter C. Willett, David M. Eisenberg, Qi Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE This study examined different cooking methods for red meats in relation to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk among U.S. women who consumed red meats regularly (2 servings/week). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We monitored 59,033 women (1986-2012) aged 30-55 years and free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline when information on frequency of different cooking methods for red meats, including broiling, barbequing, roasting, pan-frying, and stewing/boiling, was collected. RESULTS During 1.24 million person-years of follow-up, we documented 6,206 incident cases of T2D. Aftermultivariate adjustment including redmeat cooking methods, total red meat and processed red meat intake were both associated with a monotonically increased T2D risk (both P trend <0.05). Aftermultivariate adjustment including total red meat intake, a higher frequency of broiling, barbequing, and roasting red meats was each independently associated with a higher T2D risk. When comparing 2 times/week with <1 time/month, the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CI of T2D were 1.29 (1.19, 1.40; P trend <0.001) for broiling, 1.23 (1.11, 1.38; P trend <0.001) for barbequing, and 1.11 (1.01, 1.23; P trend = 0.14) for roasting. In contrast, the frequency of stewing/boiling redmeatswas not associatedwith T2Drisk, and an inverse association was observed for pan-frying frequency and T2D risk. The results remained similar after cooking methods were further mutually adjusted. CONCLUSIONS Independent of total red meat consumption, high-temperature and/or open-flame cooking methods for red meats, especially broiling and barbequing, may further increase diabetes risk among regular meat eaters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1041-1049
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes care
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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    Liu, G., Zong, G., Hu, F. B., Willett, W. C., Eisenberg, D. M., & Sun, Q. (2017). Cooking methods for red meats and risk of type 2 diabetes: A prospective study of u.s. women. Diabetes care, 40(8), 1041-1049. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-0204