Controlling pallidal oscillations in real-time in Parkinson's disease using evoked interference deep brain stimulation (eiDBS): Proof of concept in the human

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Abstract

Approaches to control basal ganglia neural activity in real-time are needed to clarify the causal role of 13–35 Hz (“beta band”) oscillatory dynamics in the manifestation of Parkinson's disease (PD) motor signs. Here, we show that resonant beta oscillations evoked by electrical pulses with precise amplitude and timing can be used to predictably suppress or amplify spontaneous beta band activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) in the human. Using this approach, referred to as closed-loop evoked interference deep brain stimulation (eiDBS), we could suppress or amplify frequency-specific (16–22 Hz) neural activity in a PD patient. Our results highlight the utility of eiDBS to characterize the role of oscillatory dynamics in PD and other brain conditions, and to develop personalized neuromodulation systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1119
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Stimulation
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this publication was funded by the Wallin Discovery Fund , the Engdahl Family Foundation , the Kurt B. Seydow Dystonia Foundation , the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( P50-NS123109 , R01-NS037019 , R37-NS077657 ), and the University of Minnesota's MnDRIVE (Minnesota's Discovery, Research and Innovation Economy) Initiative. We thank Kevin Patino Sosa for building lead adapters and connectors, and Stephanie Alberico and Kevin O'Neill for help during data collection.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

Keywords

  • Closed-loop deep brain stimulation
  • Neural oscillations
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Real-time neural control

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