Contrasting effects of chloride on growth, reproduction, and toxicant sensitivity in two genetically distinct strains of Hyalella azteca

David J. Soucek, David R. Mount, Amy Dickinson, J. Russell Hockett, Abigail R. Mcewen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The strain of Hyalella azteca (Saussure: Amphipoda) commonly used for aquatic toxicity testing in the United States has been shown to perform poorly in some standardized reconstituted waters frequently used for other test species. In 10-d and 42-d experiments, the growth and reproduction of the US laboratory strain of H. azteca was shown to vary strongly with chloride concentration in the test water, with declining performance observed below 15 mg/L to 20 mg/L. In contrast to the chloride-dependent performance of the US laboratory strain of H. azteca, growth of a genetically distinct strain of H. azteca obtained from an Environment Canada laboratory in Burlington, Ontario, Canada, was not influenced by chloride concentration. In acute toxicity tests with the US laboratory strain of H. azteca, the acute toxicity of sodium nitrate increased with decreasing chloride in a pattern similar not only to that observed for control growth, but also to previous acute toxicity testing with sodium sulfate. Subsequent testing with the Burlington strain showed no significant relationship between chloride concentration and the acute toxicity of sodium nitrate or sodium sulfate. These findings suggest that the chloride-dependent toxicity shown for the US laboratory strain may be an unusual feature of that strain and perhaps not broadly representative of aquatic organisms as a whole.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2354-2362
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Keywords

  • Chloride
  • Genetic strain
  • Hyalella azteca
  • Nitrate
  • Toxicity testing

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