Contact challenge of cattle with foot-and-mouth disease virus validates the role of the nasopharyngeal epithelium as the site of primary and persistent infection

Carolina Stenfeldt, Ethan J. Hartwig, George R. Smoliga, Rachel Palinski, Ediane B. Silva, Miranda R. Bertram, Ian H. Fish, Steven J. Pauszek, Jonathan Arzt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in cattle was investigated through early and late stages of infection by use of an optimized experimental model for controlled contact exposure. Time-limited exposure of cattle to FMDV-infected pigs led to primary FMDV infection of the nasopharyngeal mucosa in both vaccinated and nonvaccinated cattle. In nonvaccinated cattle, the infection generalized rapidly to cause clinical disease, without apparent virus amplification in the lungs prior to establishment of viremia. Vaccinated cattle were protected against clinical disease and viremia; however, all vaccinated cattle were subclinically infected, and persistent infection occurred at similarly high prevalences in both animal cohorts. Infection dynamics in cattle were consistent and synchronous and comparable to those of simulated natural and needle inoculation systems. However, the current experimental model utilizes a natural route of virus exposure and is therefore superior for investigations of disease pathogenesis and host response. Deep sequencing of viruses obtained during early infection of pigs and cattle indicated that virus populations sampled from sites of primary infection were markedly more diverse than viruses from vesicular lesions of cattle, suggesting the occurrence of substantial bottlenecks associated with vesicle formation. These data expand previous knowledge of FMDV pathogenesis in cattle and provide novel insights for validation of inoculation models of bovine FMD studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00493-18
JournalmSphere
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service-CRIS project 1940-32000-061-00D and an interagency agreement with the Science and Technology Directorate of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under award no. HSHQDC-11-X-00131. E.S., I.F., and M.B. are recipients of a Plum Island

Funding Information:
Animal Disease Center Research Participation Program fellowship, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) through an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. None of the funding sources had any role in study design, interpretation of results, or decision to publish.

Funding Information:
This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service-CRIS project 1940-32000-061-00D and an interagency agreement with the Science and Technology Directorate of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under award no. HSHQDC-11-X-00131. E.S., I.F., and M.B. are recipients of a Plum Island Animal Disease Center Research Participation Program fellowship, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) through an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. None of the funding sources had any role in study design, interpretation of results, or decision to publish. Animal Disease Center Research Participation Program fellowship, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) through an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. None of the funding sources had any role in study design, interpretation of results, or decision to publish.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Stenfeldt et al.

Keywords

  • Cattle
  • FMD
  • FMDV
  • Foot-and-mouth disease
  • Foot-and-mouth disease virus
  • NGS
  • Pathogenesis
  • Pigs
  • Transmission
  • Virus

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Contact challenge of cattle with foot-and-mouth disease virus validates the role of the nasopharyngeal epithelium as the site of primary and persistent infection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this