Constructing ‘disability’ in Myanmar: teachers, community stakeholders, and the complexity of disability models

Hannah Ware, Matthew J. Schuelka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article explores Myanmar teachers’ and community stakeholders’ constructions of disability. We examine how various religious perspectives–particularly Buddhism–inform and shape understandings of impairment and how these beliefs intersect with a strongly medicalised construction of disability. However, in our discussion and exploration of the responses, we also found that the notion of two primary disability ‘models’–namely the medical model and the social model–lack nuance, complexity, and socio-cultural consideration. Through examining teachers’ and community members’ perspectives of disability in Myanmar, we highlight the importance of socio-cultural variance in understanding local constructions of disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)863-884
Number of pages22
JournalDisability and Society
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Buddhism
  • Global South
  • Myanmar
  • disability
  • medical model
  • teachers

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