Consistency between increasing trends in added-sugar intake and body mass index among adults: The Minnesota Heart Survey, 1980-1982 to 2007-2009

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Abstract

Objectives. We described 27-year secular trends in added-sugar intake and body mass index (BMI) among Americans aged 25 to 74 years. Methods. The Minnesota Heart Survey (1980-1982 to 2007-2009) is a surveillance study of cardiovascular risk factors among residents of the Minneapolis- St Paul area. We used generalized linear mixed regressions to describe trends in added-sugar intake and BMI by gender and age groups and intake trends by weight status. Results. BMI increased concurrently with added-sugar intake in both genders and all age and weight groups. Percentage of energy intake from added sugar increased by 54% in women between 1980 to 1982 and 2000 to 2002, but declined somewhat in 2007 to 2009; men followed the same pattern (all P < .001). Addedsugar intake was lower among women than men and higher among younger than older adults. BMI in women paralleled added-sugar intake, but men's BMI increased through 2009. Percentage of energy intake from added sugar was similar among weight groups. Conclusions. Limiting added-sugar intake should be part of energy balance strategies in response to the obesity epidemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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