Connecting Minnesota

superhighways to information superhighways

Adeel Z Lari, Kenneth R. Buckeye, Mary L. Helbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Facilitation of the development of the information superhighway, which is supported by fiber-optic technology, has begun to emerge on the agendas of some transportation agencies as they search for means to satisfy communications needs, create greater efficiencies and economic benefits, and possibly stem the trend toward increasing population concentrations in urban centers. In Minnesota, the state department of transportation has embarked on a process that has evolved into a landmark public-private partnership called Connecting Minnesota to build, operate, and maintain a high-speed, statewide fiber-optic communications backbone. When complete, nearly 75 percent of the state's population will be within 16 km (10 mi) of this fiber-optic backbone. Many areas of rural Minnesota receive communications services via traditional copper wire or by limited lower-capacity fiber-optic cable. The current infrastructure does not meet the requirements for application of new and emerging technologies for the transfer of information between businesses, public agencies, educators, and friends and families. Access to advanced telecommunications technologies and services is necessary if outstate (remote) communities are to remain vital and prosperous. It has been suggested that in the next century the information superhighway will be as important to business and commerce as development of the railroads and the Interstate highway system was in the 19th and 20th centuries. Despite challenges, Connecting Minnesota and its partners are proceeding on a course for completion in 2001. Lessons learned from Minnesota's experience should help smooth the road for other states attempting to facilitate and accelerate the construction of the information superhighway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-120
Number of pages7
JournalTransportation Research Record
Issue number1690
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Fiber optics
Highway systems
Internet
Communication
Optical cables
Railroads
Telecommunication
Industry
Wire
Copper
Economics

Cite this

Connecting Minnesota : superhighways to information superhighways. / Lari, Adeel Z; Buckeye, Kenneth R.; Helbach, Mary L.

In: Transportation Research Record, No. 1690, 01.01.1999, p. 114-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lari, Adeel Z ; Buckeye, Kenneth R. ; Helbach, Mary L. / Connecting Minnesota : superhighways to information superhighways. In: Transportation Research Record. 1999 ; No. 1690. pp. 114-120.
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